Classroom Cribs

Really Intriguing:

It’s time to rethink our learning spaces. Our mission at Classroom Cribs is to enhance pedagogy and the learning experience with brain-based classroom designs that students will love.

http://classroomcribs.com/hi/?utm_content=bufferb9c8a&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Student Autonomy

The keys to the kingdom are changing hands. The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a different kind of mind—creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers and meaning makers. These people—artists, inventors, designers, storytellers, care-givers, consolers, big picture thinkers—will now reap society’s richest rewards. -Daniel Pink

 

Recently, in educational circles, like on Twitter, there has been more and more discussion about giving students more autonomy in the classroom. Just the other day I read an article posted by @Edutopia called “Student Power” that discussed the importance of independent projects for students, citing the work of Monument Mt. Regional High in Massachusetts and other schools. Student autonomy is a way to make education more relevant to students today where the future, in Daniel Pinks words, “belongs to a very different kind of person.” Meaning, educators should be focused on ways to help students enter a new world. For example, focus on ways students can take more control of their learning, to help them to be creative thinkers rather than just critical, help them to see and recognize patterns, to be able to see and make connections, and to encourage students to be “big-picture thinkers.” I like to think also that we need to help students to see solutions where most people see problems. Independence demands trusting students and can be a very challenging transition for many teachers, but as I hope to show here, the results can be far more beneficial to teachers, schools, the students we graduate, and certainly to our collective futures. 

http://bingledu.blogspot.com.es/2014/07/giving-students-autonomy.html?m=1

21 Things

The 21things4students.net project is supported by a grant from the REMC Association of Michigan and maintained by a team from three Intermediate School Districts in Michigan (Shiawassee, Ingham, and Macomb). It was created as an educational and online resource to help students improve their technology proficiency as they prepare for success in the 21st century. This project was specifically developed to provide districts and classroom teachers with resources to help students meet or exceed the 8th grade technology proficiency requirements in Michigan. The development of this resource came at the request of teachers using the initial 21things4teachers.net  site.

http://www.21things4students.net/21/begin-here/

 

How The Brain Thinks: Why Critical Thinking

Understanding How the Brain Works
For 21st century success, now more than ever, students will need a skill set far beyond the current mandated standards that are evaluated on standardized tests. The qualifications for success in today’s ever-changing world will demand the ability to think critically, communicate clearly, use continually changing technology, be culturally aware and adaptive, and possess the judgment and open-mindedness to make complex decisions based on accurate analysis of information. The most rewarding jobs of this century will be those that cannot be done by computers.

For students to be best prepared for the opportunities and challenges awaiting them, they need to develop their highest thinking skills — the brain’s executive functions. These higher-order neural networks are undergoing their most rapid development during the school years, and teachers are in the best position to promote the activation of these circuits. With the help of their teachers, students can develop the skillsets needed to solve problems that have not yet been recognized, analyze information as it becomes rapidly available in the globalized communication systems, and to skillfully and creatively take advantage of the evolving technological advances as they become available.
Read more…

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/understanding-how-the-brain-thinks-judy-willis-md